Cultural differences

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Super frequent scribe

Cultural differences

Hi beautiful people I am the eldest daughter of 2 sister's 3 brother's we were a very sporty family netball and rugby. Every Wednesday catechism (Catholic studies) church Sundays and once a month a minster of the church would visit our house with the virgin mary and we would recite the hail mary out loud counting on the rosary beads. Not our dad lol. Their was never a shortage of friends, uncles and aunties as everyone was either a cousin an uncle or aunt to our beautiful mum or her brothers or sisters. Thru our ancestors the land we lived on was gifted from our greatgrandfather. I was privileged to had met my great grandfather who did not speak english only maori. When my great grandfather spoke in maori the hairs on my arms would stand up a shiver would permeate thru my body. Proud to be maori. Kia kaha - stay strong.
Super contributor

Re: Cultural differences

That's beautiful @Serapis22 Can I ask you a couple of questions, please?

 

What was the best thing about being raised by Maori parents?

 

Have you noticed any differences between how Maori kids and Australian kids are raised?

 

Have you seen this?

 

Super contributor

Re: Cultural differences

We'd love to hear from other parents too! Let us know how you or your parent's culture affected you growing up.

Were there differences that you noticed between your culture and your friends' cultures?

Have you kept any of the cultural traditions going for your kids?

Here's the place to tell those stories. 

Super frequent scribe

Re: Cultural differences

Best thing about being brought up with maori parents. They were from different tribes which protocols were different when entering a marae (meeting house) Same values and beliefs. Both my parents did not speak maori. My grandmother on my mothers side she spoke fluent maori and she married our scottish grandfather. Our grandmother rarely spoke english. We understood her but replied in english. I remember taking maori as language subject my parents weren't able to help as they both working parents. My grandmother refused because our teacher was from a different tribe so i struggled with the language but i loved the kapa haka (performing arts) practices and traveling to school competitions.
As for children raised differently of course their is alot of differences I am very traditional, respect is lost amongst the young. We have to remind our young people manners and respect their elders